WEEKLY HEALTH UPDATE

Week of: Monday Jan. 20. 2020

Courtesy of:

John H. Keefe III, D.C.

(918) 663-1111

CHIROPRACTIC: Is Chiropractic Care a Potential Solution for Stress? Chiropractic care deals with your spine, which is the root of the nervous system. One of the many effects of stress is the tension and contraction it can cause on muscles. This further leads to uneven pressure on the skeleton. With the whole skeletal system stressed out, it’s no surprise that the body and mind feel the effects too. There are ways in which chiropractic care eliminates this stress and ultimately relieves the body of the negative effects. Reduces Muscle Tension The strain caused on the muscles due to stress eventually takes its toll on the skeletal system. It can affect your daily life, as you start to encounter problems when sitting or walking. Keep ignoring the strain for some time and you’ll end up losing sleep and experiencing pain all over the body. And that’s where chiropractic care comes in. By aligning and adjusting the body, the tension in muscles is released. By removing stress on the nervous system there is a corresponding relaxation of the muscular system as well. Removing nerve pressure causes a cascade of chemical reactions within the nervous system that produce a sense of well-being. Stay regular with your chiropractic care.

WELLNESS: Let’s all be grateful Gratitude has a long tradition within world religions, where it is viewed as a virtue that leads to a good life. One simple and proven way of cultivating gratitude is to keep a gratitude journal, in which you document the things you’re thankful for each day. From a psychological perspective, the practice of gratitude has been shown to increase happiness and life satisfaction, lower stress, increase your perceived level of social support, improve emotional resiliency and reduce depression. Biologically, gratitude reduces pain and lowers inflammation, improves your heart rate variability and lowers your risk for heart disease, and improves sleep and general health by encouraging self-care. Studies have also shown gratitude can have a beneficial impact on other areas of your life as well — boosting productivity, reducing materialism and increasing generosity, for example, all of which can improve your general happiness.

IN THE NEWS: Cancer and the New Biology of Water  In “Cancer and the New Biology of Water,” Dr. Thomas Cowan explains why cancer is not a problem of oncogenes (a gene which in certain circumstances can transform a cell into a tumor cell) but rather a problem involving the cytoplasm — the structured water — of the cell. Mitochondrial defects are an integral part of the breakdown of the structure in the water, which then triggers the formation of cancer. “When you look at what the function of the mitochondria is — which is essentially to produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP) — and you see what the role of ATP is and how integral ATP is to the structuring of the water in the cytoplasm, then you begin to see the connections between the mitochondrial dysfunction … [and the] deterioration of the cytoplasmic water that leads to cancer.”Lifestyle strategies that will help restructure the water in your cells, thereby helping prevent cancer include eating a ketogenic diet and exposing your body to sunlight and near-infrared light such as near-infrared sauna. Other strategies include grounding to the earth by walking barefoot, posing yourself to the biofields of other biological entities, such as the touch of other humans and animals, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Mistletoe therapy stimulates your fever response.  It’s an immunostimulating medicine that also works like a chemo drug.

FUNNY BONES Late one night this guy is speeding down the empty road. A cop sees him go flying past so chases him and pulls him over. The cop goes up to the car and when the man rolls down the window, he asks, “Are you aware of how fast you were going, sir?” The man replies, “Yes I am. I’m trying to escape a robbery I got involved in.” The cop looks at him disbelievingly and asks him, “Were you the one being robbed, sir?” The man casually replies, “Oh no, I was the one who committed the robbery. I was escaping.” The cop is shocked and surprised that the man has admitted this so freely. He says, “So you’re telling me you were speeding…AND committed a robbery?” “Oh yes,” replies the man calmly. “I have all the loot in the back.” The cop is now starting to get angry and says, “Sir, I’m afraid you have to come with me” as he reaches into the window to take the car keys out of the ignition. The man shouts, “Don’t do that! I’m afraid that you’ll find the gun in my glove compartment!” At this the cop pulls his hand out of the window and says, “Wait here” as he returns to his car and calls for backup. Soon there are cars, cops and helicopters all over, everywhere you look. The man is quickly dragged out of his car, handcuffed and taken towards a cop car. However, just before he is put in the car and taken away a cop walks up to him and says, while pointing at the cop that pulled him over, “Sir, this officer tells us that you had committed a robbery, had stolen loot in the trunk of your car, and had a loaded gun in your glove compartment. However, we didn’t find any of these things in your car.” The man replies, “Yeah, and I bet that liar said I was speeding too!”@@ Definitions from a different perspective: Feet-a device used for finding Legos in the dark. Clapping-repeatedly high-fiving yourself for someone else’s accomplishment. Secrets-something you tell everyone to tell nobody. Laziness-risking to drop everything you carry rather than walking twice. Teenager-when you’re too young for half the things you want to do and too old to do the other half.

WEEKLY HEALTH UPDATE

Week of: Monday Jan. 13, 2020

Courtesy of:

John H. Keefe III, D.C.

(918) 663-1111

IN THE NEWS: Scientists Now Know How Sleep Cleans Toxins From the Brain

The synchronized brain waves of non-REM sleep may play a key role in preventing toxins from accumulating in a person’s brain. Researchers have been putting in late nights in their Boston University lab. Lewis ran tests until around 3:00 in the morning, then ended up sleeping in the next day. It was like she had jet lag, she says, without changing time zones. It’s not that Lewis doesn’t appreciate the merits of a good night’s sleep. She does. But when you’re trying to map what’s happening in a slumbering human’s brain, you end up making some sacrifices. “It’s this great irony of sleep research,” she says. “You’re constrained by when people sleep.” When we sleep our brains travel through several phases, from a light slumber to a deep sleep that feels like we’ve fallen unconscious, to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, when we’re more likely to have dreams. Lewis’ work looks at non-REM sleep, that deep phase which generally happens earlier in the night and which has already been associated with memory retention. One important 2013 study on mice showed that while the rodents slept, toxins like beta amyloid, which can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease, got swept away. What she discovered was that during non-REM sleep, large, slow waves of cerebrospinal fluid were washing over the brain. The EEG readings helped show why. During non-REM sleep, neurons start to synchronize, turning on and off at the same time. “First you would see this electrical wave where all the neurons would go quiet,” says Lewis. Because the neurons had all momentarily stopped firing, they didn’t need as much oxygen. That meant less blood would flow to the brain. But Lewis’s team also observed that cerebrospinal fluid would then rush in, filling in the space left behind. The study also could have clinical applications for treating Alzheimer’s. Recent attempts at developing medications have targeted beta amyloid. But drugs that looked promising at first all failed once they got into clinical trials. “This opens a new avenue,” says Nedergaard. Instead of trying to act on one particular molecule, new interventions might instead focus on increasing the amount of cerebrospinal fluid that washes over the brain.

WELLNESS: Imbalance of fatty acids linked to most common age-related diseases Chronic disease is on the rise. Right now, 133 million Americans – nearly half the population – have at least one chronic illness such as diabetes or heart disease. With so much illness prevalent – and with the aging of the population overall – it’s no wonder many individuals are worried about healthy aging.  But, could consuming the proper amount of omega 3 fatty acids be part of the solution? Research shows most Americans are not consuming enough omega 3 fatty acids in their diets. Turns out this is hugely problematic, and not just because people aren’t getting enough of these healthy nutrients. People also aren’t consuming the right ratio of fatty acids – which is believed to be a major driver of age-related health problems. Omega 3 fatty acids, including EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), are healthy nutrients found abundantly in fatty fish. Another kind of fatty acids are called omega 6 fatty acids.  These are primarily found in foods containing sunflower, cottonseed, soybean, and corn oils – in other words, processed foods. This is exactly why the modern diet (which is heavy with processed foods) causes humans to consume way more omega 6 fatty acids and not enough omega 3 fatty acids.  In ancient history, our ancestors’ diet included a more balanced omega 6 to omega 3 ratio of about 4 to 1.  Today’s typical human has a ratio of 20 to 1! Why is this extreme ratio so bad for health and believed to be driving age-related diseases?  Well, the most common type of omega 6 fatty acid (called linoleic acid) gets transformed in the body into a substance that promotes inflammation and blood vessel constriction. While this isn’t necessarily “bad,” it is bad when so much omega 6 is being consumed that these inflammatory and blood vessel changes becomes chronic and widespread, which we see in things like heart disease. NOTE: do you need more omega 3, 6 or 9. Getting Vega testing can help determine your balance.

CHIROPRACTIC:  21 Benefits you might not have known: Improves joint mobility, function and health. Makes tight muscles loose and loose muscles tight and improves the contractibility (thereby strength) of the muscle. Decreases degeneration of the joint and connective tissues (arthritis). Decreases the on-­-going inflammatory process associated with the subluxation. Improves circulation taking stagnant blood out and bringing new blood in. Speeds up the recovery process. Improves nerve system function and the individual nerve’s ability to carry nerve impulses more efficiently. Strengthens the immune system. Improves individual organ system function (heart, lung, sinuses, digestive, etc). Improves a person’s disposition (they’re more FUN to be around). Calms a hyperactive mind and energizes a depressed mind. Increases energy, vitality and improves sleep. Relieves/Improves Prenatal Discomfort Decreases length of labor and associated back pain. Decreases the adverse effects of stress. Improves athletic performance (for ANY sport). Improves Quality of Life by enhancing the enjoyment/fulfillment of a person’s Key Values Prevention ability for sickness, disease and pain. Improves overall health and wellness for infants and children. Improves cognitive ability (ability to THINK more clearly). Oh…and it DECREASES PAIN!

FUNNY BONES: During the heat of the space race in the 1960’s, NASA quickly discovered that ballpoint pens would not work in the zero gravity confines of its space capsules. After considerable research and development, the Astronaut Pen was developed at a cost of $1 million. The pen worked in zero gravity, upside down, underwater, on almost any surface including glass and also enjoyed some modest success as a novelty item back here on earth.

The Soviet Union, when faced with the same problem, used a pencil.

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WEEKLY HEALTH UPDATE

Week of: Monday Jan. 6, 2020

Courtesy of:

John H. Keefe III, D.C.

(918) 663-1111

CHIROPRACTIC: Keeping the immune system strong during cold and flu season Spinal adjustments have been shown to boost immune function because they serve to correct the spinal misalignments that cause neural dysfunction. … Even one adjustment can bring about an immediate immune boost. A chiropractic adjustment isn’t the only way to increase your immune function.  Several years ago a scientists studying chiropractic patients found they had a 200% more active immune system than the average person on the street.  Because the nervous system regulates and controls all other systems of the body including the immune system when you release stress on the nervous system through an adjustment you allow the immune system to better express itself in defending you against viruses and bacteria. It’s important to maintain some type of regular care in order to reap these benefits. During cold and flu season is an excellent time to get weekly adjustments. Also remember the five laws of health: a clean diet including plenty of filtered water, some form of regular exercise, rest and relaxation (7-9 hours of sleep), a positive mental and spiritual attitude, and a nervous system free of pressure. As more and more independent research shows how ineffective the flu shot is, utilize natural healthcare to give your body the best chance. And if you notice early signs of a cold or they get testing can help determine the nutrients your body’s needing to better fight. Remember, chiropractic first, drug second and surgery last. Stay well in the new year utilize regular chiropractic care.

WELLNESS: Immune-boosting foods to get you through cold and flu season  

Ginger tea When it comes to treating a common cold, ginger is one of the best foods for relief. In a review published in the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, researchers summarized that ginger’s potent anti-inflammtory properties were key in the root’s powers to combat a cold or flu. Oranges are packed with vitamin C, an essential nutrient when you’re feeling under the weather. Water When you’re feeling sick, good ol’ H2O can be one of the most helpful drinks to sip. Staying hydrated can help loosen trapped mucus. Greek yogurt is filled with sickness-fighting probiotics and is packed with more protein than regular yogurt. A meta-analysis published in the journal Korean Journal of Family Medicine found that probiotics can help to prevent and treat the common cold. Blueberries are filled with antioxidants that can help treat and prevent coughs and colds. According to research conducted by the University of Auckland, consuming flavonoids — a class of antioxidants found in blueberries — made adults 33 percent less likely to catch a cold than those who did not eat flavonoid-rich foods or supplements daily. Ginseng tea is popular for more reasons than its delicious taste. Namely, the tea has been used as a treatment for upper respiratory tract infections (aka the common cold). Wild salmon is filled with zinc, a nutrient that has been proven to assist with reducing common cold symptoms. Green tea is one of the best sources for fighting off a cold. It contains flavonoids, an antioxidant that boosts immunity, and has anti-inflammatory properties, according to a study published in the Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology. Garlic has built a reputation for being one of the best cold-curing foods, and for good reason. A review of the food published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews showed that a group of participants in a study who ate garlic over a three-month period only had 24 cases of the common cold total, a significant decrease in comparison to the 65 cases reported by the control group.

IN THE NEWS: Get dramatic relief from the symptoms of menopause naturally The good news: Multiple clinical studies demonstrate the efficacy of Siberian rhubarb. Used in Germany for over a quarter of a century to treat menopause symptoms, Siberian rhubarb extract is derived from the rhizomes (or underground stems) of rhapontic rhubarb, which is botanically known as Rheum rhaponticum. In a landmark study published in Menopause, researchers gave either a placebo or 4 mg of Siberian rhubarb extract a day to a group of 109 women suffering from symptoms of perimenopause.  And, the results were dramatic! The rhubarb group experienced a 54 percent decrease in total symptom scores, as measured by the Menopause Rating Scale (since 2004, the MRS has been acknowledged as the gold standard for evaluating menopausal symptoms). In addition, there were “significant improvements” in all 11 menopause symptoms.  In other words, there was no symptom that did not respond to the therapy – truly encouraging news! No adverse effects were reported, leading the team to conclude that the extract was well tolerated and safe.

FUNNY BONES: Anne went away to college and promptly became an avid animal right activist. When she came home for the Holidays she noticed her mother wearing a beautiful genuine fur coat. “Oh Mom,” Anne exclaimed in a disapproving tone, “some animal must have suffered terribly just so you can get a fur coat.” “ANNE!” Screamed her Mom Aghast ” I SEND YOU AWAY TO COLLEGE AND YOU COME BACK TALKING LIKE THAT?! HOW DARE YOU TALK THAT WAY ABOUT YOUR DAD!!!”@@ As a popular local politician I always try to help out whenever I can. So that’s how it came to be that when a fellow came up to me in a hotel lobby the other day and asked me for a small favor I was more then happy to oblige. “Hi,” said the fellow, introducing himself as Bob Smith. “I’m having a very important business meeting in a few minutes, and it’s very important that I impress them. If you can just come over during our meeting and say hello I would be forever indebted to you!” So that’s how a few minutes later, I found myself walking over to the fellow with a big smile on my face, “Hi Bob!” I said. “I barely got the words out of my mouth when Bob looked up with an annoyed expression, “DON’T BOTHER ME NOW CHRIS. CAN’T YOU SEE I’M IN THE MIDDLE OF AN IMPORTANT MEETING?!