WEEKLY HEALTH UPDATE Week of: Monday Dec. 11, 2017

 

Courtesy of:

John H. Keefe III, D.C.

(918) 663-1111

 

IN THE NEWS: Chuck Norris Focuses Attention on Heavy Metal Risks After Enhanced MRI Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a study allowing your physician to see detailed images of your organs and tissues using a large magnet and radio waves. Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) may be prescribed to enhance the image but the heavy metal gadolinium is known to deposit in your brain, bone and organs. The FDA acknowledges the metal may be found in your tissues for years but claims there is no known effect, despite the rising number of people suffering from kidney damage, cognitive dysfunction and muscle wasting. Strategies you may consider if an enhanced MRI is absolutely necessary include optimizing your gut and nutrition, eating fermented foods and using a sauna to aid detoxification. After undergoing three MRIs with GBCAs to evaluate her rheumatoid arthritis, Gena O’Kelley, the wife of American film icon Chuck Norris, began experiencing severe physical symptoms that began with a burning sensation in her skin. She described it as if there was acid burning her skin, slowly covering her body.  She reports that she visited the emergency room five or six nights in a row, while doctors ran multiple tests for ALS, MS, cancer and Parkinson’s disease. However, it was O’Kelley who made the connection between her burning skin, contracted arm and cognitive issues and the multiple MRIs she had undergone. She told Full Measure: “When we got to the hospital in Houston this last time, and I’m so bad and I said, listen, I am sober enough in my thinking right now, because I had such brain issues going on, I said I’m only going to be able to tell you this one time and I need you to listen to me very closely. I have been poisoned with gadolinium or by gadolinium and we don’t have much time to figure out how to get this out of my body or I am going to die.” After five months of treatment in China and then in a clinic in Nevada, O’Kelley was able to return home to her seven children for continued treatment by a physician in Houston. Norris shared their tax return records documenting $2 million over three years in uninsured medical expenses to help O’Kelley return to health. Now Norris is suing 11 medical companies for the part they played in not warning the couple and others of the dangers of using a GBCA for MRI contrast.

WELLNESS: Salt and Good Health Salt is essential not only to life, but to good health. The National Academy of Sciences recommends that Americans consume a minimum of 500 mg/day of sodium to maintain good health. Individual needs, however, vary enormously based a person’s genetic make-up and their lifestyle. While individual requirements range widely, most Americans have no trouble reaching their minimum requirements. Most consume “excess” sodium above and beyond that required for proper bodily function. The kidneys efficiently process this “excess” sodium in healthy people. Experimental studies show that most humans tolerate a wide range of sodium intakes, from about 250 mg/day to over 30,000 mg/day. The actual range is much narrower. Americans consume about 3,500 mg/day of sodium; men more, women less. Salt has been wrongly demonized as a major contributor to high blood pressure. Factors that play a significantly greater role include your sodium-to-potassium ratio, and a high-sugar, processed food diet. Symptoms of sodium deficiency may include muscle fatigue, spasms, cramps and heart palpitations. Such symptoms may disappear by adding more salt to your diet. In the 1600s, the average person was consuming up to 100 grams of salt per day from salted cod, herring and meats. Today, most people get 10 grams of salt per day or less, yet we have far higher rates of hypertension. Low-sodium diets may lower blood pressure. However, this reduction in blood pressure may not necessarily translate into a reduction in cardiovascular events. In fact, the reduction in blood pressure may actually be harmful by potentially increasing heart rate, as well as the risk of falls and fractures. NOTE: Some people are salt sensitive and should consider a salt substitute. Table salt is considered dead salt as it only contain sodium chloride, Himalayan salt contains around 70 other minerals and is considered much healthier.

Dr. Keefe, Keefe Clinic. Tulsa Chiropractor, pain, natural health care.

CHIROPRACTIC: Chiropractic care in low-back pain, leg pain, and idiopathic chronic testicular pain: SUBJECT: A 36-year-old male patient had low-back pain, right leg pain, and testicular pain that was worsening. All had been present for 5 years. He had been seen by several medical physicians and had lumbar magnetic resonance imaging and x-rays performed. All were read as normal. Examination revealed tenderness of the testicles bilaterally with no masses or other abnormality of the testicles or scrotum. Orthopedic and neurological testing was unremarkable. Tenderness rated 8 out of 10 was noted at the L4 spinous process. RESULTS:   After 4 weeks, the patient’s low-back pain was decreased and his leg pain was gone. The testicular pain was improved after the first treatment and gone after 3 weeks of care. The patient was followed up by telephone at 3 and 6 months after discharge to find out if the testicle pain had returned, which it had not.

FUNNY BONE: Father: “Son, you were adopted.” Son: “What?! I knew it! I want to meet my biological parents!” Father: “We are your biological parents. Now pack up, the new ones will pick you up in 20 minutes.”@@ Redneck at the doctor: “Doc, I think I’m in trouble, I swallowed an ice cube 3 days ago and it ain’t come out yet.”@@ I asked my Mom if I was ugly. She said, “I told you not to call me Mom in front of people.” @@ Thank you student loans for getting me through college. I don’t think I can ever repay you.@@ Every single morning I get hit by the same bike. It’s a vicious cycle.@@ My wife asked me to pass her lip balm. I gave her superglue by mistake. She’s still not talking to me.

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